Bone Grafting Procedures

Replace Essential Dental Bone with Grafting

Infection of the gums can cause gum disease—either gingivitis or the more severe form called periodontitis. With periodontitis, the gums move away from the teeth to form pockets where bacteria become trapped.

The connective tissue and bone surrounding a tooth and its root will deteriorate as they are exposed to these bacteria. This leads to tooth loss and permanent bone loss in the jaw. In some cases, dental bone loss can be the result of prescribed medications, certain diseases, and tumors in the jaw or elsewhere.

Bone grafting allows us to replace the lost bone in most cases and create a foundation for a dental implant. A dental implant can be used to replace a single tooth, a section of teeth, or provide a firm base for attached (yet removable) full-mouth dentures. By replacing missing teeth, it protects the strength and position of the natural teeth, and helps to prevent additional bone loss.

Bone grafting and dental implant procedures can vary depending on the individual situation. For example, a tooth may be extracted and a bone graft and dental implant are performed at the same time. For a tooth that has fallen out on its own, a bone graft may be performed first, followed by an implant simultaneously or in the near future.

Finally, if there has been extensive bone loss over time, bone grafting surgery is performed, but with a longer healing period before implants. Of course, every case is different. Our periodontists are pleased to review each aspect of the procedure with you in our office, by using physical models and computer graphics to demonstrate. At Feldman, Fitzgerald, & Choe, we address every concern.

Contact us today to schedule an exam or a consultation.